Tired eyes at the end of a long work day are typical, especially if you do close-up work or stare at a computer monitor all day. Once rested, if you are still having problems with your eyes, it might be something serious. These following two eye diseases can sneak up on you, becoming severe before you are even aware you have them. Pay attention to your eyes and get to the ophthalmologist if a good night’s sleep doesn’t make the problems go away. Cataracts Before you know something is wrong, a friend or family member may ask you if there is something in your eyes. Cataracts show up as a slight fuzziness in the lens of your eye. Other people can see the discoloration, but you may only notice an occasional blurring of your vision. Cataracts show up in about 25 percent of adults over 65, reports the National Eye Institute. The cause is the buildup of a protein in the lens making it look cloudy. Cataracts progress slowly and you may have them for years before they really bother your vision. You may find that over-the-counter reading glasses make your eyes feel less tired when you work or read. This also delays a trip to the eye doctor for a relatively simple procedure to correct the problem. Your optometrist can replace your cloudy lenses with artificial ones called an intraocular lens implant (IOL). These lenses aren’t susceptible to the protein buildup so you may have these for the rest of your life. On a rare occasion, IOLs can’t be used. In that case, the doctor will remove the cloudy lenses and you’ll use glasses or contacts as a replacement. In either case, these procedures can be done in the doctor’s office as an outpatient. This makes it a procedure you should get done as soon as cataracts are detected so you’ll have your sharp vision back. Macular Degeneration The National Eye Institute notes that age-related macular degeneration (AMD) occurs in less than 1 percent of the senior population over 65, but it is the leading cause of complete or partial vision loss. This is definitely one eye problem not to be ignored as it can be slowed down, but any damage already done cannot be reversed. A small spot on your retina called the macula is responsible for collecting light to see objects directly in front of you. With AMD, small blood vessels can leak in that area, or dry patches develop on the macula. You’ll see this first as dark blotches in your straight-ahead vision. Colors may look faded. Objects in the center of your vision may be blurry while your peripheral vision remains intact. If left...