Are you tired of dealing with nagging overuse injuries from running? An exciting new study suggests that for many runners, weak hip flexors and glutes contribute to the development of running injuries. Those with weaker butts, it seems, are more prone to injuries like IT band syndrome and runner’s knee. If you want to stay injury free, then work on strengthening your butt. Here are a few exercises to incorporate into your workout routine for stronger glutes and healthier running. Basic Squats There’s no easier way to form a strong butt than with plenty of squats. If this is your first time doing squats, start by performing them without any added weight. Stand with your toes pointed forward and your feet shoulder-width apart. Cross your arms across your chest. Then, bend at the knees to move into a squatting position. Focusing on pushing your butt out and back as you squat. You should squat as deeply as you are able, and then stand back up again. Doing three sets of 20 squats is adequate. As you become more used to squatting, add weight to make the exercise harder. Start by holding just a 10-pound weight, and gradually increase the weight over time as your body adapts. One-Legged Planks Planks are a favorite core-strengthening exercise among runners. A regular plank strengthens the abdominals and back muscles. Switch to a one-legged version, and you’ll activate your glutes as well. Get into the normal plank position, in which your weight is supported on your elbows and toes. Your back should be completely straight, as it would be if you were about to do a pushup. Then, raise one leg off of the ground. Hold in that position for 10 seconds, lower it, and then raise the other leg for 10 seconds. Repeat as many times as you comfortably can before lowering yourself to the ground again. Side Leg Lifts This exercise activates both the glutes and the many muscles in your hips. Lie on your side, with your legs stacked one on top of the other. Then, raise the top leg about 8–10 inches off the other one. Hold this position for 30 seconds, then lower your leg back to the floor. Repeat five times, and then switch sides. As your body adapts to this exercise, you can add ankle weights to make it more challenging. The secret to injury-free running is in a strong backside! Work these exercises into your training routine, and you’ll reduce your risk of injury within just a few weeks. If you’re in need of physiotherapy for an injury, visit SoulSpace Physical...